Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Aging Dads: Incontinence Issues--Part 1 Older Men

incontinence-condition


....Although the high rise of incontinence is in women 75 and over, and the rise is less dramatic in men, incontinence–usually temporary (3-6 months)–is common following prostate surgery. Also as men age the sphincter muscle that controls urine outflow can weaken due to more and more years of use. Doctors recommend Kegel exercises for men (with varying degrees of success depending on different factors)......


To view entire post please visit my other site.

Thursday, September 25, 2014

Aging Parents: Important New Guidelines Could Make it Easier for Those nearing Life's End

DYING IN AMERICA AND HONORING INDIVIDUAL PREFERENCES NEAR THE END OF LIFE, with recommendations for major changes, was issued last week (9/17/14) by THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF MEDICINE'S RESEARCH ARM, THE INSTITUTE OF MEDICINE. It suggests an overhaul of current practice at almost every level.

To view entire post, please visit my other site.

Sunday, September 21, 2014

Aging Women: Incontinence----and Diapers?!*

     Just published: The American College of Physicians' New
 Guidelines
re: women's urinary incontinence, triggers thoughts:

1.  An experience with Mother.
2.  One of this blog's key thoughts: Is it better for parents or better for us (in this instance the caregiver)?
3.  A prejudice about the word "diapers" used in conjunction with old/older people's incontinence.


.......The American College of Physicians' new guidelines for dealing with female urinary incontinence recommend special exercises--as opposed to medications--first. Maintaining feelings of normalcy helps parents--and everyone--age well.  

FYI: "Urinary incontinence (UI), the involuntary loss of urine, has a prevalence of approximately 25% in young women (aged 14 to 21 years) (1), 44% to 57% in middle-aged and postmenopausal women (aged 40 to 60 years) (2), and 75% in elderly women (aged ≥75 years)" American College of Physicians


To view entire post please visit my other site



Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Aging Parents: 101st Birthday

Birthday card from the staff

                                             Birthday card from the staff

We stick to our philosophy. We do what aging parents want as long as it doesn't threaten life and limb and they still have, what Sr. Advisor R calls, "a good head." R's birthday was Saturday...her 101st. We follow the advice in last year's post: Celebrating Elders Birthdays: What They Want, Not What We Want.

To view entire post, please go to my other site.

Thursday, September 11, 2014



Sharing with SantaMemories are part of our being. They allow us to momentarily recapture ourDad's 90th youth, milestone events, surprises large and small and so much more. If "Time Takes  All But Memories" (see August post) from elders who've lost spouses, good health, friends, family etc., can we supply happy memories for them--as well as for aging parents and the older people we care about?

    5 Suggestions


Visit my other site to view entire post.

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Do Parents Get Enough Exercise? How Much Should They Get? HHS Guidelines for Older Adults' Physical Activity

man using weights


Older People Worry About Falling 
Older People Want Independence 
Older People Don't Wish To Be Limited By Physical Problems

I doubt anyone will dispute these assertions. On the other hand, are we--or most older people--aware of the physical activities that help aging adults retain independence so they can continue to age well?

In 2008 the Department of Health and Human Services published Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans, the first comprehensive guidelines on physical activity ever issued by the Federal government, with a section that focuses on "Older Adults." Tufts provided this update this week:

To view entire post, please go to my other site.

Sunday, August 24, 2014

Aging Parents: "Time Takes All But Memories"

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/3a/Sundial_2r.jpg/128px-Sundial_2r.jpg


Can the elderly be sustained by memories?

I came across a speech excerpted from a 1965 memorial service. A sun-dial inscribed "Time Takes All But Memories" inspired a sermon (in part below) making me wonder: What's it like for the isolated elderly? Do they have only memories?

"What is true for the dead, is equally true for the living. When there is no one to think of us, no one to care for us--even though we be alive, is it not as though we are dead? To be sure, I am not speaking of mere physical survival, for a man might breathe and eat and pump blood for 969 years like the legendary Methuselah in the Bible--but who wants to live if he has no one who loves him, no one who cares for him, no one who remembers him? Total, perpetual endless loneliness is, I daresay, even worse than death itself."

Please go to my other site to view entire post with, of course, ideas to make life better for the isolated elderly and those who feels no one cares.